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ECONSULT 

please click on the link below to complete an Econsult

https://chapellanesurgery-formby.webgp.com/

 

Chapel Lane Surgery is located on Chapel Lane in Formby and covers patients in Formby, Freshfield, Hightown and Ince Blundell.

The surgery is managed as a non-limited partnership between the doctors within the practice. The Partners are D J Proctor, D Callow, Mrs Katie White and Dr E Ball

 

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Latest News

PCN

PRIMARY CARE NETWORK

(21 Jul 2020)

Primary Care Networks As part of the NHS Long Term plan, a new 5 year contract has been put in place for GPs which will mean that GP surgeries join Primary Care Networks. This means that practices are forming agreements to work with neighbouring practices in groups of approximately 30-50000 registered patients. For Hightown and Chapel lane surgery this has meant joining forces with our colleagues at the Hollies and Formby Village surgery making a new Formby Care Network (PCN) serving 27000 patients. Although each practice will retain its own identity and patient list PCNs and July 1st herald the beginning of a long journey. In time this will bring about more collaborative working and place each PCN at the heart of an integrated care system. This will incorporate hospitals, community providers , social care organisations, voluntary and faith groups and other primary care providers such as pharmacists and dentists. Most observers regard this as one of the most significant changes to the way general practice is organised since the creation of the NHS. Our surgeries are both committed to be at the forefront of how this develops in our community. There are many aspects to primary care networks just a few are listed below Empower and support General practice-member practices and not Primary Care Networks will make a difference to patient care. ​Networks have to ensure their member practices get what they need to deliver change locally Identify and engage with all the key local leaders of organisations the Primary Care Network will need to do business with (including the LMC) Invest time in building relationships with them and make sure we maintain a strong local voice for general practice​ Influence and be prepared for tough discussions and maintain a real clarity of purpose PCNs as part of the long term plan will hold seats on integrated care system boards as the means of providing full engagement with primary care. ​ Primary Care Networks need to agree a clear strategy with their practices. It will probably be something like this A strong and vibrant general practice with the registered list as the foundation of local healthcare delivery Service delivery tailored to the specific needs of the Primary Care Network population Integrated primary and community care teams at the Primary Care Network level The removal of barriers between primary and secondary care, between health and social care, and between physical and mental health A greater focus on health and prevention Workforce and risk mitigation The start of this journey (and where we are today) is joint working between practices, but very quickly this will evolve into joint working between that group of practices and the rest of the local health and social care economy. This is the network agreement practices have signed up to, and these are the changes that are on their way.

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PSA

PSA

(21 Jul 2020)

PSA testing There has been a LOT of media interest in PSA testing since Stephen Fry and Bill Turnbull ‘went public’ about their prostate cancer.It is very important to be aware that the evidence around testing has however not changed. There is no screening programme for prostate cancer because it does not meet essential criteria. It is neither 100% specific or sensitive. We should not be actively talking about PSA screening unless men are symptomatic or specifically ask about it. Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in men. About 1 in 8 white men will get it in their lifetime, which is similar to the risk of breast cancer in women. However, only about 1 in 25 will die from it. So, more men die with prostate cancer than of it. There is a risk management programme, and men are entitled to ask for a PSA test if they have made an informed decision. A rectal examination should always be used in combination with PSA testing. When we are talking about screening for prostate cancer, we are talking about ASYMPTOMATIC MEN. Symptomatic men with lower urinary tract symptoms may need a PSA test as part of their clinical work up, but should still be fully informed about the pros and cons of testing. PSA Age-specific cut offs should be (ng/ml): a level higher than this is abnormal 40–49 y: ≥2. 50–69 y: ≥3 70 y or older: ≥5. (Based on the latest National Screening Committee Prostate Cancer Risk Management Programme, although older NICE CKS says ≥4 for those aged 60–69y). FAQ’s 1. Any partient requests made to staff for PSA testing based on health anxiety or a 'wish for screening' in asymptomatic patients should be given the PSAleaflet if over the age of 50 years to read and consider if they want to proceed to testing or not In anyone under that age the request should be forwarded as a task to the usual GP for their attention 2. Patients having agreed to the PSA test as an informed choice will need to see a GP for a rectal examination as well -we cannot offer the PSA test without a DRE being agreed to. 3. If a patient is symptomatic and requesting the PSA test they should be booked in with a GP or ANP and any testing can be done after the assessment Before having a PSA test, men should not have: • an active urinary infection (PSA may remain raised for many months) • ejaculated in the previous 48 hours • exercised vigorously in the previous 48 hours • had a prostate biopsy in the previous 6 weeks • PSA is stable in whole blood for up to 16 hours at room temperature. When taking blood you should ensure that the specimen will reach the laboratory and be separated within this time frame. click here for further information

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Covid-19

(21 Jul 2020)

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) Coronavirus update BMA The NHS across Sefton will be better prepared for outbreaks of new infectious diseases if the public follows Public Health England advice The NHS has put in place measures to ensure the safety of patients and staff which may mean your patient experience is subject to change Please do not attend the Surgery or A&E if you have any of the following symptoms: a high temperature or a new continuous cough loss of taste or smell Please continue to follow latest Government advice

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